Art and Science Transdisciplinary Lectures: Mel Chin, Artist. Whitehouse to the Safehouse

Lecture Tue 30 Nov 2010 6.00PM-8.00PM Sheila C. Johnson Design Center
Kellen Auditorium
Parsons The New School for Design
66 Fifth Avenue at 13th Street, Ground Floor
Free admission
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A new initiative co-organized with the School of Art, Media, and Technology and the Fine Arts Program Parsons, this lecture series captures the increasingly trans-disciplinary nature of scientific, academic, artistic and cultural practices and, in particular, focuses on the complex cross-disciplinary settings for arts production in contemporary life.
    • Art and Science Transdisciplinary Lecture. Mel Chin, Artist, Whitehouse to the Safehouse. Part I
    • Art and Science Transdisciplinary Lecture. Mel Chin, Artist, Whitehouse to the Safehouse. Part II
    • Art and Science Transdisciplinary Lecture. Mel Chin, Artist, Whitehouse to the Safehouse. Part III
Artist Mel Chin discusses the philosophical and conceptual development of selected works in relation to the notion of sustainability. For more than three decades, Chin has been developing a unique and socially engaged body of work in which cultural diversity and global solidarity played an important role. His project Revival Field, perhaps his most well-known work, has made him one of the most important pioneers of ecological art. His works have been defined as "sculptural witnesses to ecological and political tragedies." Whether examining American imperialism in Central America, 9/11, the fate of the Native American Indians, civil wars in postcolonial Africa, abuse at Guant√°namo Bay, the extinction of animal species, or the way in which people pollute the natural world, Chin's practice creates an arena in which social and (geo)political activism are coupled with ideas from philosophy, biology, history, religion, anthropology, literature, and alchemy. Chin received a BA from Peabody College in Nashville, Tennessee, in 1975, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1988 and 1990. He lives in North Carolina.